Differences between residential and commercial alarms

April 15, 2016

 

The intruder alarm market, especially in developed economies, has always shown steady growth, unlike some other sectors of security that have remained more volatile. According to Research and Markets, the global intrusion detection market is expected to grow from $2.7 billion in 2014 to $5 billion by 2019, at an estimated CAGR of 13.2 percent. Another report from Marketsandmarkets suggests the home security solutions market alone could grow from $31.4 billion in 2015 to $47.5 billion by 2020, at an estimated CAGR of 8.7 percent.

But alarms are not all the same. Depending on the different nature and needs, intruder alarm solutions in residential and commercial sites could differ in certain features and functions.
 
Daniel Wan, UK Channel Marketing Manager at Honeywell Security & Fire - Security, said his company’s wireless security systems for homes are designed in such a way that enables it to be placed anywhere in the home. Its discreet design and small size ensures it fits-in with the home décor, and its long battery life lets owners use it without regular, intrusive checkups.
 
According to Daniela Hossmann, Head of Regional Business Unit Intrusion in EMEA at Bosch Sicherheitssysteme, the main difference lies in the products being certified and non-certified.
 

“Certified systems are suited for small applications (that require an explicit certification) such as small offices or shopping stores up to high-end applications such as banks and airports. The smart home solution is not certified.”

-Daniela Hossmann, Head of Regional Business Unit Intrusion in EMEA at Bosch Sicherheitssysteme



“Certified systems are suited for small applications (that require an explicit certification) such as small offices or shopping stores up to high-end applications such as banks and airports,” Hossmann said. “The smart home solution is not certified.”
 
In terms of their application, however, the general principles remain the same, according to Hassan Uddin Ahmed, International Sales Manager at Pyronix. In residences as well as commercial sites, fitting a passive infrared motion and/or dual technology detectors are the basic norm. Other sensors can be installed as per the requirements, which include carbon monoxide (CO) sensors and smoke detectors. Shock sensors on the windows are also advisable. 

 

http://www.asmag.com/showpost/20219.aspx

Please reload

Featured Posts

Sensors bring intelligence for smart parking management

June 29, 2016

1/10
Please reload

Recent Posts
Please reload

Archive